Select Page
Mentoring the 2nd career

How can mentoring be helpful to me? New EMCC Global definition of Mentoring

Friday, October 29th, the 4th EMCC Global mentoring conference was taking place, in which not once was mentioned the new definition of mentoring.

 

What is it, you ask?

“Mentoring is a learning relationship involving the sharing of skills, knowledge, and expertise between a mentor and mentee through developmental conversations, experience sharing, and role modeling. The relationship may cover a wide variety of contexts and is an inclusive two-way partnership for mutual learning that values differences.”

 

So, when you find a mentor, you could expect the mentor to share their experiences, knowledge, tips and tricks, their network, and that they will also be your partner in thinking and learning, always looking for the best solution to any problem.

How can mentoring be helpful to me?

Here are some of my old mentee’s ideas about the benefits of mentoring.

 

  • My mentors’ insight and advice helped me crystallize my ideas

 

  • I obtained a better understanding that there are more options than I have to pick between. I was given alternatives, new paths to take, new directions for changing my specialty of work. Those were precisely the answers I was looking for.

 

  • With the help of some questions, it’s now easier to understand and approach different situations.

 

  • My mentor helped me reflect on my own work, see situations from a different angle, and decide what and how to do something.

 

  • From my mentor, I received sincere support on the path of public speaking, friendly encouragement to discover the full potential of my voice, specific advice on finding the right content, proper appeal, and the correct visual presentation of my speech.

 

  • Mentoring has helped me adapt successfully to my new managerial role and strengthened my personal and professional competencies. I have learned to delegate more, be more flexible, and be less assertive. Having witnessed the mentoring experience myself, I later contributed to the improvement and development of the mentoring system in the organization. To date, I have been successfully applying the knowledge and experience I have gained in my current job and informally mentoring my colleagues.

 

  • Our conversations were very reflective – analyzing how things went from a different perspective, what worked, and what should be changed. Having a mentor close by, observing and communicating with me: what he sees and what he hears was an excellent tool for me to use for my work with my team.

 

Mentoring is a learning relationship involving sharing skills, knowledge, and expertise between a mentor and mentee through developmental conversations, experience sharing, and role modeling. The relationship may cover various contexts and inclusive two-way partnership for mutual learning that values differences (EMCC Global

Look around! Whom can you ask to be your mentor?

 

google-site-verification: google80f9ec7c472d6af3.html